If you were born in February, your birthstone is Amethyst

Did you know that all birthstones have a history that dates back to 600-400 BC?

According to scholars, people began wearing the birthstone associated with their birth month in the 17th century. 
At Princess Diamonds, we love this tradition and offer an enormous selection of genuine lose and set gemstones to showcase your birthstone in a personalized way that fits both your personality and budget. Below are the origins of the birthstones’ that correspond to your birthday month.

January: Garnet

Garnets are generally dark and red in color. The tone of reds can range from a rust color to a deep violet. Although rare, some garnets can be blue, colorless, or (most rare of all) change colors in different lights. The word garnet comes from a 14th century Middle English word meaning “dark red”. The folklore about garnet is extensive. Legend has it that garnets can bring peace, prosperity, and good health to the home. Some even call it the “Gem of Faith” and it’s believed that to those who wear it and do good things, the more good will come to you. The garnet also symbolizes deep and lasting friendship. With that legend in mind, give garnet to someone whose friendship you deeply value. 

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February: Amethyst

Amethyst is a purple quartz and beautiful blend of violet and red that can be found in every corner of the earth. The name comes from ancient Greek, derived from the word “methustos” which means “intoxicated”. The amethyst symbolizes peace, stability, courage, and strength. An amethyst also celebrates the 6th and 17th year of marriage.

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March: Aquamarine

Derived from the Latin word “aqua”, aquamarines are a blue color and often associated with water and the sea. This gemstone was once believed to protect sailors while out on their voyages. Historically, aquamarines have been popular gifts for brides at their wedding to symbolize long unity and love. Some even believe it could re-awaken love between two people. Aquamarine also celebrates 19 years of marriage.

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April: Diamond

Diamonds come several colors, including yellow, red, pink, blue, and green. Aswell as a range in intensity. Generally speaking, the more saturated the color, the higher the value. Throughout history, the diamond has nearly always symbolized eternal and lasting love. So whether you’re getting engaged or simply want to give yourself a truly meaningful gift, the diamond has both beauty and enduring symbolism.

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May: Emerald

Emeralds are known for their green color. Emerald is derived from the word “smaragdus” meaning “green” in Greek. The emerald is a symbol of rebirth, believed to grant the owner foresight and good fortune. Cleopatra is the most famous historical figure to cherish emeralds. She even claimed ownership of all emerald mines in Egypt during her reign.

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June: Alexandrite

Alexandrites are an exciting stone that changes color depending on lighting conditions. This rare and valuable stone was discovered in 1834, making it a fairly modern gemstone. The alexandrite symbolizes strength, intuition, creativity, and imagination. It is also believed to bring good omens to anyone who wears it.

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June: Moonstone

Moonstones have a blue sheen finish and were named by Roman historian Pliny the Elder in the 1st century. He wrote about the moonstone’s shimmery appearance, which he believed shifted with each phase of the moon. Romans believed it was formed by moonbeams. Hindu mythology believed moonstones were from the moon’s ethereal light. Today, many moonstones are healing stones that represent our deep feminine energy. This stone can bring us wholeness, balance, and stability. 

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June: Pearl

Pearls come in a variety of colors, but are most commonly white or cream. Interestingly, pearls are the only gemstones made by living creatures. The word “pearl” can refer to anything rare and valuable. Throughout history, pearls have been associated with tears. The Greeks believed they were the tears of the gods. Ancient Japanese believed they were tears of mythical creatures such as mermaids.

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July: Ruby

Rubies are known for their rich and vibrant red color. In ancient Sanskrit, ruby means “king of precious stones”. Rubies have been one of the most revered and treasured precious stones throughout history. Ancient scholars believed rubies brought success in wealth, love, and battle. A ruby is also a symbol of passion, protection, and prosperity.

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August: Peridot

Peridots are lime green in color. They are a symbol of prosperity and good fortune according to folklore. 

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August: Spinel

Spinel’s red color often has the gemstone mistaken for a ruby. Some of the most famous rubies in history turned out to be spinel. This stone was a favorite during the time of many English monarchs, including Henry VIII. 

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September: Sapphire

Sapphires typically come in a shade of royal blue to navy blue. Fancier colors include yellow, pink, orange, and purple. Sapphire is the gemstone of royalty and symbolizes loyalty, sincerity, and integrity. 

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October: Opal

Opal is hard to describe as being one color. Opals are generally a combination of two or more colors which give it a rainbow kaleidoscope effect, some call a play of color. Folklore and legends have described opals falling from the sky in bolts of lightning to the creator and he/her coming to Earth on a rainbow, leaving pieces of opal behind. 

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October: Tourmaline

Due to its colorful occurrences, tourmaline has been confused with other gemstones throughout history. Native Americans had, for centuries, given certain colors of the gemstone as funeral gifts. The Chinese Empress Dowager Cixi was particularly fond of pink tourmaline. Brazilian tourmaline discoveries in the 1980s and 90s reignited interest in this gemstone, because material mined in Paraíba displayed such striking neon greens, radiant blues, and vivid violets.

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November: Citrine

Citrine is pale yellow to brownish orange quartz. This gemstone takes its name from the citron fruit because of the lemon shades. In ancient times, people believed that citrine gemstones could calm tempers, soothe anger, and manifest desires, especially prosperity. 

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November: Topaz

The variety of topaz hues includes colorless, light blue, yellow, orange, pink, violet, brown and, very rarely, red. Some believe the word “topaz” comes from the Sanskrit word tapas, which means “fire.” Others trace it back to the Greek topazos. The ancient Greeks believed that topaz gave them strength. From the 1300s to the 1600s, Europeans thought it could thwart magic spells and dispel anger. For centuries, many people in India have believed that topaz worn above the heart assures long life, beauty and intelligence. The distinctly pinkish orange Imperial topaz has aristocratic cachet. Blue topaz is the gem of the 4th wedding anniversary and Imperial topaz is the gem of the 23rd wedding anniversary.

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December: Turquoise

Turquoise is a bluish green semi-precious stone. The name comes from the 13th century, when it was exported to Europe out of Turkey. From ancient Egyptians to Persians, Aztec and Native Americans, kings and warriors alike admired turquoise for thousands of years. It adorned everything from jewelry to ceremonial masks. 

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December: Zircon

Zircon is the oldest mineral on earth, dating back more than 4.4 billion years. Found in the earth’s crust, it’s common in most sands and sedimentary deposits, as well as magma. During the middle ages, people believed that zircon could induce sound sleep, ward off evil, and bring wisdom.

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December: Tanzanite

Tanzanite is the exquisite blue-purple variety of the
mineral zoisite that is only found in one part of the
world. Named for its limited geographic origin in
Tanzania, tanzanite has quickly risen since its
relatively recent discovery in 1967.

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